May 29, 2024 6:32 am
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Red wolf pups signal hope for endangered species in NC

Legislation aimed at increasing private school voucher funding in North Carolina is causing concern among educators, particularly in rural areas, as it diverts money from public schools. Deanne Meadows, superintendent of the Columbus County School District, highlighted that underfunding has already forced them to consolidate schools and that private schools receiving vouchers lack the same accountability and inclusivity as public schools.

Durham leaders hope 2024 will be different for local workforce housing legislation

The North Carolina Senate has passed an amended version of House Bill 237, which prohibits mask-wearing in public and increases penalties for crimes committed while wearing a mask. The bill, which has faced significant opposition from advocates and organizations concerned about its impact on health exemptions and protest rights, now returns to the House for concurrence.

Impact of private school voucher funding on rural areas raises concern

Legislation aimed at increasing private school voucher funding in North Carolina is causing concern among educators, particularly in rural areas, as it diverts money from public schools. Deanne Meadows, the Columbus County School District superintendent, highlighted that underfunding has already forced them to consolidate schools and that private schools receiving vouchers lack the same accountability and inclusivity as public schools.

Biden administration touts NC investments to kick off “Infrastructure Week”

The Biden administration’s significant infrastructure investments are transforming North Carolina, highlighted by projects such as the $110 million replacement of the Alligator River Bridge and the $1 billion high-speed rail line connecting Raleigh to Richmond. However, with only 17% of the allocated $1.1 trillion spent to date, the administration faces challenges in demonstrating these impacts to voters before the upcoming November election.

Group takes steps to protect NC farm workers from heat stress

In North Carolina, farmworkers face extreme heat with minimal legal protections, prompting the Farm Labor Organizing Committee to strengthen existing rules to enhance safety measures for over 9,000 workers. The updated guidelines empower workers to take necessary breaks and stay hydrated, particularly when temperatures rise, reflecting a critical step toward self-managed health and safety amidst inadequate enforcement of labor laws.

Cooper renews call for public school investments, blasts GOP voucher expansion as “larceny”

In a recent press conference, Governor Roy Cooper of North Carolina reiterated his call for increased public school funding and opposed expansion of the private school voucher program, labeling Republican efforts as a “reverse Robin Hood scheme.” He also highlighted proposed legislation that would impose stricter regulations on private schools benefiting from taxpayer-funded vouchers, aiming to enhance accountability and ensure compliance with educational standards.

Hundreds of faculty and staff members call on UNC-CH to dismiss charges against student protesters

More than 750 faculty and staff members at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have signed a letter urging administrators to drop charges against students involved in a peaceful protest at Polk Place. The faculty criticized the administration’s decision to involve the police, arguing it contradicted the university’s commitment to free expression and created a militarized atmosphere that traumatized students.

North Carolina to receive $76m to replace drinking water lines that contain lead

North Carolina will benefit from an additional $76 million in federal funding to replace lead-contaminated drinking water lines, announced by the Biden administration. This grant is part of a larger $9 billion initiative aimed at removing hazardous lead pipes nationwide, particularly focusing on aiding disadvantaged and pollution-burdened communities.

NC needs to remove hurdles that keep former offenders from finding jobs, advocates say

Advocates in North Carolina are pushing for “Second Chance” legislation to alleviate the long-term burdens on those previously incarcerated or arrested without conviction, aiming to improve their access to jobs, housing, and social inclusion. At a news conference, Sen. Julie Mayfield highlighted the challenges faced by these individuals, including job and housing discrimination, and punitive financial obligations that perpetuate poverty.